Press Review 2012

14.07.2012 - RT (Russia)
UN meetings and Syrian massacres: Timing is everything
The Syrian government and the rebels blame each other for an alleged massacre in the village of Tremseh. As with the previous mass murder news in Syria, reports of the bloodshed appear just in time of a crucial point in foreign diplomacy over Syria. [...] A Middle East expert from the University of Mainz, Dr. Guenter Meyer, is even more direct in his assessment of the latest developments. He says the rebels are trying to drum up support for their cause. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.07.2012 - www.research-in-germany.de
Physicists in Mainz and all around the world cheer the discovery of the Higgs particle
Success at the world's largest particle accelerator LHC / Experiments involving scientists from Mainz University show first direct evidence of the Higgs boson ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.07.2012 - CHEM_EUROPE.COM
Inspired by nature: Paints and coatings containing bactericidal agent nanoparticles combat marine fouling
Vanadium pentoxide nanoparticles mimic natural enzymes and inhibit surface build-up of algae and bacteria ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.07.2012 - Nigerian Tribune
When wine makes you sneeze, develop headache
Wine isn’t always the way to ensure a healthy heart, at least for everybody. Experts say that some individuals who take wine, because of their intolerance experience symptoms such as runny nose, headache, cold symptoms, itchy rashes, all akin to allergy [...] Recognising there have been few case reports of wine intolerance or wine allergy, researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz in Germany set out to study the prevalence of wine intolerance among a single region’s adult population. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
10.07.2012 - New Scientist
Tree rings suggest Roman world was warmer than thought
How did the Romans manage to grow grapes in northern England when most climate studies suggest the weather was much cooler then? We may now have an answer: it wasn't that cold at all. Long-term temperature reconstructions often rely on the width of tree rings: they assume that warmer summers make for wider rings. Using this measure, it seems that global temperatures changed very little over the past two millennia. [...] Jan Esper of Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, thinks that at least some of those tree rings actually show something else: a long-term cooling trend that lasted right up until the Industrial Revolution. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
10.07.2012 - Bio-Medicine
Scientists at the Mainz University Medical Center gain new insights into Taspase1 function
Scientists at the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany identified a novel strategy to target the oncologically relevant protein-cleaving enzyme Taspase1. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
10.07.2012 - News-Medical.Net (Australia)
Scientists identify novel strategy to target Taspase1 enzyme
Scientists at the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany identified a novel strategy to target the oncologically relevant protein-cleaving enzyme Taspase1. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.07.2012 - The Huffington Post
Wine Intolerance May Be Experienced By 7 Percent Of Adults, Study Suggests
We've all heard about the heart-healthy perks of enjoying red wine in moderation. But a certain segment of the population might not be able to reap those benefits -- according to new research, about 7 percent of people might actually have a physical intolerance to alcohol. A new study in the German peer-reviewed science journal Deutsches Arzteblatt International shows that "wine intolerance" may affect 8.9 percent of women and 5.2 percent of men. To conduct the study, German researchers from the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz sent out questionnaires to 4,000 people between ages 20 and 69. Of those people, 948 responded. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.07.2012 - PhysOrg.com
Climate in northern Europe reconstructed for the past 2,000 years
An international team that includes scientists from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has published a reconstruction of the climate in northern Europe over the last 2,000 years based on the information provided by tree-rings. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.07.2012 - United Press International (UPI)
2,000 years of European climate studied
A reconstruction of 2,000 years of European climate, using tree rings as a measuring tool, shows a trend for 2 millennia of climatic cooling, researchers say. An international team including scientists from Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, analyzed annual growth rings in trees as important witnesses during the past 1,000 to 2,000 years to how warm and cool past climate conditions were. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
08.07.2012 - University World News
Student use of stimulants for cognitive enhancement
Pharmacological cognitive enhancement is a topic of increasing public awareness, according to German researchers ... zum Langtext des Artikels
06.07.2012 - NANO Magazine
Bactericidal nanoparticles combat marine fouling
Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have discovered that tiny vanadium pentoxide nanoparticles can inhibit the growth of barnacles, bacteria, and algae on surfaces in contact with water, such as ship hulls, sea buoys, or offshore platforms. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
05.07.2012 - United Press International (UPI)
Study: 7 percent wine intolerant
About 7 percent of adults suffer from an intolerance to wine, researchers in Germany found. The researchers at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz said wine is an ancient food across cultures all over the world, and its effects on health have been extensively studied -- but only a few case reports of wine intolerance or wine allergy have been reported. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.07.2012 - AZoNano - The A to Z of Nanotechnology
Scientists Look to Nature to Solve Marine Fouling with Vanadium Pentoxide Nanoparticles
About 200 billion dollars per year is the cost incurred by the shipping industry due to the marine fouling problem. Organisms such as mussels, algae, and barnacles, accumulate on the ship's surface over time and increase the surface's water resistance, thereby increasing fuel consumption and extra CO2 emissions. Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have found a feasible solution in tiny vanadium pentoxide nanoparticles, which they claim can prevent the growth of organisms on surfaces in contact with water, such as ship hulls, offshore platforms, and sea buoys. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
27.06.2012 - PhysOrg.com
Mainz University coordinates new EU project on the origins of human settlement
Bridging the European and Anatolian Neolithic" is the name of a new multinational educational network which has received funding from the European Commission for the next four years. It is classified as a so-called Initial Training Network (ITN) in the EU Marie Curie Actions program, which allows young scientists early access to research activity at top international institutions. [...] Anthropologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have been meticulous in their preparation of the project over the last years and have entered into various cooperations to underpin it. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
22.06.2012 - Science Daily
The Blue Blood of the Emperor Scorpion X-Rayed
Biologists from Mainz University are the first to successfully crystallize the hemocyanin of the emperor scorpion to shed new light on the structure and active site of the giant oxygen transport protein. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
22.06.2012 - British Journal of Healthcare Computing
Ambulatory monitoring of patients will become mainstream
Daily monitoring of health and behaviour gives more useful information for healthcare decision making, so patients will become even more involved in the observation and monitoring of their own health or illnesses at home, according to two health psychologists, writing in a special issue of Psychosomatic Medicine that covers this subject in depth. Dr Thomas Kubiak, Professor of Health Psychology at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany and Arthur Stone of Stony Brook University in the US, believe that our everyday state of health and behaviour is much more helpful in determining proper diagnoses and therapies than lab-only results or questionnaires in which patients are asked to provide retrospective information about their state of health over the last few weeks or months. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
11.06.2012 - The Hindu (India)
Recognising computer addiction in adolescents
When trying to determine whether a child is addicted to computer games or the Internet, parents should not only consider the amount of time the child spends at it. This is according to Klaus Woelfling, co-director of the Outpatient Gambling Addiction Department at Mainz University Medical Centre's Clinic for Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
06.06.2012 - Eurasia Review
Exploiting Nanoparticles To Hunt For Hidden Cancer Cells
The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research is providing over €300,000 for the next three years to fund a new research project at the Mainz University Medical Center aimed at using nanoparticles to detect dispersed tumor cells in cancer patients. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
05.06.2012 - Hostingtecnews.com
New HPC Systems Position German Region as Leader in Scientific Computing
Two new high-performance mainframe computers went into full production at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and at the University of Kaiserslautern. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
05.06.2012 - Chemistry World
Chiral separation with micro-flows
How do you separate enantiomers without any kind of chiral recognition between molecules? The answer it seems is to use asymmetric flow in a micro-fluidic channel. According to computer simulations run by scientists in Germany and Sweden, particles will move to different regions of the channel according to their chirality. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
21.05.2012 - AZoNano - The A to Z of Nanotechnology
Volkswagen Foundation Provides €550,000 Grant for Project on Quantum Computers
The Volkswagen Foundation, in continuation of its support to the joint materials science project undertaken by the Universities of Osnabrück and Mainz, has allocated €550,000 to be disbursed over a period of three years. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
18.05.2012 - Nanowerk
Performing quantum calculations using fullerenes and carbon nanotubes
The Volkswagen Foundation is financing a materials science project being conducted jointly by the universities in Mainz and Osnabrück in collaboration with the Jülich Research Center. The support is to be provided over a period of three years and will total €550,000. The project managers, Professor Dr. Angelika Kühnle and Dr. Wolfgang Harneit of the Institute of Physical Chemistry at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), were notified of the grant in March 2012. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.05.2012 - Kuwait Times
Treatment for phantom sounds of tinnitus - Exposure to loud noise could lead to hearing loss
It can be a whistling, a clicking, a ringing or a hissing that no-one else hears because it exists only in the person’s own ears. The phantom sounds are called tinnitus and their cause is not entirely clear. For some people, the sounds go away by themselves in a few days. Other people have to live with them for decades. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can help sufferers not to focus on the noises constantly, and scientists in Mainz have offered CBT online for the first time in Germany - with success. There are various definitions of tinnitus. "We say it’s any noise in the ears that has no external source," said Maria Kleinstaeuber, a psychologist at Mainz University. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
05.05.2012 - The Mercury (Australia)
Tassie's Mars mission
A scientist who helped NASA launch a successful mission to Mars has given Tasmania a special link with the mysterious Red Planet. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
04.05.2012 - CNN
Survey: 1 in 4 users lie on Facebook
[...] A 2010 study of college students in the United States and Germany revealed that they typically presented accurate versions of their personalities on Facebook and a similar German site. "Online social networks are so popular and so likely to reveal people's actual personalities because they allow for social interactions that feel real in many ways," said psychologist Mitja Back of Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz ... zum Langtext des Artikels
26.04.2012 - PhysOrg.com
Mainz University Medical Center attracts funding of an Alexander von Humboldt Professorship
The Mainz University Medical Center has been successful in attracting funding of an Alexander von Humboldt Professorship worth €5 million. The funding was awarded in response to an application to appoint Professor Dr. Wolfram Ruf, a blood coagulation researcher (hemostaseologist) currently based in the USA, to the Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis (CTH) in Mainz. The success of the application was announced jointly by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
23.04.2012 - www.research-in-germany.de
Shakespeare Illustration Archive Oppel-Hammerschmidt at the Mainz University Library goes online
Users worldwide have now full digital access to thousands of Shakespearean illustrations ... zum Langtext des Artikels
22.04.2012 - The San Francisco Chronicle
Germany, devoted to print, slow to embrace e-books
As any rail commuter has noticed, the number of people ditching paperbacks in favor of a Kindle or iPad is exploding. E-books accounted for 20.2 percent of all books sold in the United States last year, up from 7.3 percent in 2010, according to Bowker Market Research. But that mass adoption of the digital word is still far off in one of Europe's most literate nations, Germany, where e-books account for only 1 percent of all book sales, according to a report published last month by market research firm GdK. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
19.04.2012 - Businessweek
The Story Behind Germany's Scant E-Book Sales
As any New York City subway passenger has noticed, the number of people ditching paperbacks in favor of a Kindle or iPad is exploding. E-books last year accounted for 20.2 percent of all books sold in the U.S., up from 7.3 percent in 2010, according to Bowker Market Research. But that mass adoption of the digital word is still far off in one of Europe’s most-literate nations, Germany, where e-books account for only 1 percent of all book sales, according to a report published last month by the market research firm GdK. [...] "Germans have an emotional connection to books," [Dominique Pleimling, a researcher at the Institute of Book Studies at the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz] says, noting that the printing press was invented in Germany and publishers to this day take great pride in producing top-quality books there. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
19.04.2012 - Deutsche Welle
Foreign policy unlikely to change under new Syrian leadership
Large parts of the Syrian people have risen up against their regime. But a Middle East expert tells DW that the country's leadership and the opposition have quite a few points in common when it comes to foreign policy. Günter Meyer is a Professor of Geography at Germany's Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz and head of the Center for Research on the Arab World. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.04.2012 - Spiegel Online
'We Read Best on Paper' - Cultural Resistance Hobbles German E-Book Market
Compared to the booming e-book market in the US, Germany's digital book sales are dismal. A set of cultural and economic factors mean that even in a country known for its bibliophilia, the technology will take a long time to catch on. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
10.04.2012 - CHEM_EUROPE.COM
End of the magic: Shell model for beryllium isotopes invalidated
Atomic nuclei in laser light: Nuclear physicists investigate magic shells ... zum Langtext des Artikels
04.04.2012 - Nanowerk
Novel nanoparticle technique for single protein observation
Researchers must be able to recognise how proteins work so that they can understand the related biological processes that occur at the molecular level. They get this information by labelling proteins with fluorescent substances. The problem with this method, however, is that it alters the proteins and influences the biological processes under investigation. A new study from Germany has pioneered a novel method able to observe individual proteins. [...] Researchers at the Johannes Gutenberg University (JGU) in Mainz, Germany are responsible for the new technique. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
31.03.2012 - United Press International (UPI)
Internet-based therapy reduces tinnitus
Internet-based therapy was as effective as group therapy sessions for people with tinnitus, researchers in Germany and Sweden found. Dr. Maria Kleinstauber of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and colleagues at the Linkoping University in Sweden divided patients with moderate to severe tinnitus into three categories: those receiving group therapy, those receiving Internet-based therapy and a control group that only participated in an online discussion forum. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
30.03.2012 - Discovery News
Cows Almost Impossible To Domesticate, DNA Reveals
Cattle aren't known for their intelligence. Perhaps it's because their family tree has a very skinny trunk. Genetic evidence suggests all "taurine" cattle (the most commonly recognized breed) descend from only about 80 females and came from a single region in what is now Iran about 10,500 years ago. A study in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution traced the modern global herd's heritage back to its ancestral home on the range. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
28.03.2012 - Daily Mail
DNA traces all cattle back to an 80-strong herd domesticated around 10,500 years ago
All cattle are descended from as few as 80 animals that were domesticated from wild ox in the Near East some 10,500 years ago, according to a new genetic study. An international team of scientists from University College London (UCL), the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) in France and the University of Mainz in Germany, were able to conduct the study by first extracting DNA from the bones of domestic cattle excavated in Iranian archaeological sites. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
27.03.2012 - PhysOrg.com
DNA traces cattle back to a small herd domesticated around 10,500 years ago
All cattle are descended from as few as 80 animals that were domesticated from wild ox in the Near East some 10,500 years ago, according to a new genetic study. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
15.03.2012 - PhysOrg.com
Information processing in Drosophila: New EU research network for doctoral candidates
Eight European research institutes, including Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), and three commercial partners have joined forces in an EU project to provide young academics with an outstanding research environment in the field of systemic neuroscience. The project by the name of FLiACT has been awarded four years of EU-funding through the Marie Curie Actions program. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.02.2012 - www.research-in-germany.de
Art historian at Mainz University participates in a new project on the history of royal residential cities
The long-term cultural studies project will examine the interaction between the bourgeois civil society and courtiers in urban environments ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.02.2012 - Eurasia Review
New Database For Islamic Documents From The Middle Ages
Scholars from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany are participating in the creation of a new database for Arabic documents from the 8th to 15th centuries A.D. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
23.01.2012 - Nanowerk
Third issue of the Journal of Unsolved Questions now available
The third issue of the Journal of Unsolved Questions (JUnQ) is now available online and in print. JUnQ was founded in 2010 by doctoral students of the Graduate School of Excellence "Materials Science in Mainz" (MAINZ) in cooperation with scientists from around Europe. Since then, the journal has generated a great deal of interest. Its goal is to provide a forum through which information can be made available on the kind of excellent but inconclusive scientific projects that established scientific journals tend to ignore. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
17.01.2012 - PhysOrg.com
New Collaborative Research Center 1044: The low-energy frontier of the standard model
The German Research Foundation (DFG) has approved funding for the establishment of a new Collaborative Research Center (CRC) at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. Beginning in January 2012, CRC 1044 "The Low-Energy Frontier of the Standard Model: From Quarks and Gluons to Hadrons and Nuclei" will tackle fundamental questions within the world of subatomic particles. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
17.01.2012 - The Sacramento Bee
First Preclinical Proof-of-Concept of Mutation-Based Individualized Cancer Vaccine: Deep sequencing of immunogenic mutations may pave way for customized immunotherapy
The Institute of Translational Oncology (TRON) together with BioNTech AG today announced the publication of a joint paper in the international journal Cancer Research that describes a new path for individually tailored cancer therapy.  An interdisciplinary team of genome scientists and immunologists led by the cancer researcher Prof. Ugur Sahin for the first time demonstrated that whole cancer genome information could be used to tailor effective cancer specific vaccines. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.01.2012 - The Local
Canine name trend leaves Bello in dog house
Today's dog owners are well travelled, creative linguists who enjoy a drink - or so they'd like their pet’s name to suggest, as traditional canine names such as Bello are replaced by more individual choices, a new study says. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
10.01.2012 - www.chemeurope.com
First hint of the Higgs boson particle
Particle physicists at Mainz University are excited: 50 years after its prediction, the Higgs boson gradually takes shape ... zum Langtext des Artikels
06.01.2012 - Science Daily
First Hint of the Higgs Boson Particle
The answer to one of the most exciting questions in particle physics seems almost close enough to touch: Scientists at the Geneva research center CERN have observed first signs of the Higgs boson and now believe that they will soon be able to prove the existence of the elementary particle they have been trying so hard to isolate. It is the last missing piece in the puzzle of the Standard Model of particle physics to explain the structure of matter. A discovery would be sensational news. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
05.01.2012 - BBC Nature
Ants turned into 'supersoldiers'
Ants can be programmed to become "supersoldiers", according to an international team of researchers. ... zum Langtext des Artikels

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