Press Review 2014

15.04.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Sibling cooperation in earwig families gives clues to early evolution of social behavior
Looking at the question of how social behavior has developed over the course of evolution, scientists from the universities in Mainz and Basel have gained new insights from the study of earwigs. "Young earwig offspring don't simply compete for food. Rather the siblings share what is available amongst themselves, especially when the mother is absent," explained Dr. Joël Meunier of the Evolutionary Biology section of the Institute of Zoology at Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz (JGU). The team of biologists from Mainz University and the University of Basel investigated the interactions between siblings of the European earwig (Forficula auricularia). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.04.2014 - ECN Magazine [USA]
Domain walls in nanowires cleverly set in motion
Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have achieved a major breakthrough in the development of methods of information processing in nanomagnets. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.04.2014 - Daily News [USA]
Domain walls in nanowires cleverly set in motion
Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have achieved a important breakthrough in the improvement of procedures of data processing in nanomagnets. Using a new trick, they have been in a position to induce synchronous motion of the domain walls in a ferromagnetic nanowire. This involved applying a pulsed magnetic field that was perpendicular to the plane of the domain walls. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.04.2014 - AZoNano - The A to Z of Nanotechnology [Australia / UK]
Major Breakthrough in Methods of Information Processing in Nanomagnets
Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have achieved a major breakthrough in the development of methods of information processing in nanomagnets. Using a new trick, they have been able to induce synchronous motion of the domain walls in a ferromagnetic nanowire. This involved applying a pulsed magnetic field that was perpendicular to the plane of the domain walls. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.04.2014 - Research in Germany
Domain walls in nanowires cleverly set in motion
Important prerequisite for the development of nano-components for data storage and sensor technology / Publication in Nature Communications ... zum Langtext des Artikels
08.04.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Domain walls in nanowires cleverly set in motion
Researchers have achieved a major breakthrough in the development of methods of information processing in nanomagnets. Using a new trick, they have been able to induce synchronous motion of the domain walls in a ferromagnetic nanowire. This involved applying a pulsed magnetic field that was perpendicular to the plane of the domain walls. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
08.04.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Domain walls in nanowires cleverly set in motion
Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have achieved a major breakthrough in the development of methods of information processing in nanomagnets. Using a new trick, they have been able to induce synchronous motion of the domain walls in a ferromagnetic nanowire. This involved applying a pulsed magnetic field that was perpendicular to the plane of the domain walls. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.04.2014 - MedicalXpress
Computational methods for studying gene and protein function
Miguel Andrade uses computational methods for studying gene and protein function with an emphasis on molecules related to human disease. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.04.2014 - News-Medical.Net [Australia]
Researchers investigate how gene regulation affects evolution and development
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has received EUR 900,000 for three years to investigate, jointly with the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), how gene regulation affects evolution and development. The ambitious new research initiative GeneRED, or Gene Regulation in Evolution and Development, is jointly run by IMB and JGU's Faculty of Biology, funded by the Ministry of Education, Science, Continuing Education, and Culture of Rhineland-Palatinate. Its overarching goal is to gain insight into how epigenetics, i.e., the regulation of genes by elements outside the classical DNA code, can influence the development of organisms, both in the short term (growth and aging) and the long term (evolutionary adaptation). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.04.2014 - Research in Germany
New research initiative investigates gene regulation in evolution and development
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and Institute of Molecular Biology collaborate in three-year research project funded by the Ministry of Science ... zum Langtext des Artikels
02.04.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
New research initiative investigates gene regulation in evolution and development
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has received EUR 900,000 for three years to investigate, jointly with the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), how gene regulation affects evolution and development. The ambitious new research initiative GeneRED, or Gene Regulation in Evolution and Development, is jointly run by IMB and JGU's Faculty of Biology, funded by the Ministry of Education, Science, Continuing Education, and Culture of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
18.03.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Immunologists present improved mass spectrometric method for proteomic analyses
When it comes to analyzing cell components or body fluids or developing new medications, there is no way around mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry is a highly sensitive method of measurement that has been used for many years for the analysis of chemical and biological materials. Scientists at the Institute of Immunology of the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have now significantly improved this analytical method that is widely employed within their field. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
17.03.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Improved mass spectrometric method for proteomic analyses presented by immunologists
When it comes to analyzing cell components or body fluids or developing new medications, there is no way around mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry is a highly sensitive method of measurement that has been used for many years for the analysis of chemical and biological materials. A new breakthrough discovery offers new perspectives for research on the immune and nervous system. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.03.2014 - The Queensland Times [Australia]
Europeans have become 'whiter' in the past 5000 years
European humans have become "whiter" in the past 5,000 years, undergoing a distinct change in their DNA due to natural selection, according to scientists. In research published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, experts analysed DNA taken from ancient skeletons and compared it with the current European human genome. Teams from University College London and Mainz found that there were striking differences over time in the genes which are associated with hair, skin and eye pigmentation. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.03.2014 - International Business Times
Europeans are Getting Whiter, Ancient DNA Proves
Europeans are getting whiter, with lighter hair and eye pigmentation, researcher have discovered. An international team including anthropologists from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and geneticists at UCL analysed the DNA from 5,000-year-old skeletons. They found evidence that Europeans used to have darker skin, hair and eyes, with further analysis showing this change was a result of natural selection. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.03.2014 - The New Zealand Herald [New Zealand]
Europeans have become whiter
European humans have become "whiter" in the past 5,000 years, undergoing a distinct change in their DNA due to natural selection, according to scientists. In research published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, experts analysed DNA taken from ancient skeletons and compared it with the current European human genome. Teams from University College London and Mainz found that there were striking differences over time in the genes which are associated with hair, skin and eye pigmentation. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
12.03.2014 - The Independent
Europeans have 'got whiter' due to natural selection in past 5,000 years, scientists say
European humans have become "whiter" in the past 5,000 years, undergoing a distinct change in their DNA due to natural selection, according to scientists. In research published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, experts analysed DNA taken from ancient skeletons and compared it with the current European human genome.Teams from University College London and Mainz found that there were striking differences over time in the genes which are associated with hair, skin and eye pigmentation. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
12.03.2014 - French Tribune [France]
Europeans were Black about 5,000 Years Back, Say Researchers
On analyzing DNA samples from ancient skeletons, researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz have revealed that selection plays significant role in the evolution of the human genome even in the past 5,000 years. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
12.03.2014 - RedOrbit [USA]
Europeans' Appearance Altered Over Five Millennia Of Natural Selection
A great deal of research has been focused on the factors that have influenced the human genome since the end of the last Ice Age.An international team of scientists – including anthropologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), geneticists at University College London (UCL), and archaeologists from Berlin and Kiev – has analyzed ancient DNA from skeletons, finding that natural selection has had a major effect on the human genome even in the past 5,000 years. The result of this selection has been sustained changes to the appearance of people. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
11.03.2014 - The New Indian Express [India]
Europeans Had Darker Skin and Hair 5,000 Years Ago
Europeans had darker skin, hair and eye pigmentation 5,000 years ago – until natural selection resulted in lighter pigmentation, according to a new study of DNA from ancient skeletons. Anthropologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany and geneticists at University College London (UCL), worked in collaboration with archaeologists from Berlin and Kiev to analyse ancient DNA from skeletons. They found that natural selection has had a significant effect on the human genome even in the past 5,000 years, resulting in sustained changes to the appearance of people. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
11.03.2014 - Science World Report [USA]
Sexual Selection Lead to White Europeans in Just the Past 5000 Years
There has been much research into the factors that have influenced the human genome since the end of the last Ice Age. Anthropologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and geneticists at University College London (UCL), working in collaboration with archaeologists from Berlin and Kiev, have analyzed ancient DNA from skeletons and found that selection has had a significant effect on the human genome even in the past 5,000 years, resulting in sustained changes to the appearance of people. The results of this current research project have been published this week in an article entitled "Direct evidence for positive selection of skin, hair, and eye pigmentation in Europeans during the last 5,000 years" in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
11.03.2014 - Business Standard [India]
Europeans had darker skin, hair and eye pigmentation 5,000 years ago
New analysis from ancient DNA of archaeological skeletons shows that Europeans had darker skin, hair, and eye pigmentation 5,000 years ago.Anthropologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and geneticists at University College London (UCL), working in collaboration with archaeologists from Berlin and Kiev, have analyzed ancient DNA from skeletons and found that selection has had a significant effect on the human genome even in the past 5,000 years, resulting in sustained changes to the appearance of people. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
10.03.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Natural selection has altered the appearance of Europeans over the past 5,000 years
There has been much research into the factors that have influenced the human genome since the end of the last Ice Age. Anthropologists, geneticists and archaeologists have analyzed ancient DNA from skeletons and found that selection has had a significant effect on the human genome even in the past 5,000 years, resulting in sustained changes to the appearance of people. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
10.03.2014 - Science
New Diet, Sexual Attraction May Have Spurred Europeans' Lighter Skin
Why do some humans have lighter skin than others? Researchers have longed chalked up the difference to tens of thousands of years of evolution, with darker skin protecting those who live nearer to the equator from the sun's intense radiation. But a new study of ancient DNA concludes that European skin color has continued to change over the past 5000 years, suggesting that additional factors, including diet and sexual attraction, may also be at play. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
10.03.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Natural selection has altered the appearance of Europeans over the past 5,000 years
Anthropologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and geneticists at University College London, working in collaboration with archaeologists from Berlin and Kiev, have analyzed ancient DNA from skeletons and found that selection has had a significant effect on the human genome even in the past 5,000 years, resulting in sustained changes to the appearance of people. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.03.2014 - Opli [Israel]
Relativity shakes a magnet
Researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz demonstrate a new principle for magnetic recording / Publication in Nature Nanotechnology ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.03.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Relativity shakes a magnet
The research group of Professor Jairo Sinova at the Institute of Physics at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), in collaboration with researchers from Prague, Cambridge, and Nottingham, have predicted and discovered a new physical phenomenon that allows to manipulate the state of a magnet by electric signals. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
26.02.2014 - Nanowerk
Electron on the scale
Electrons are the quantum glue of our world. Without electrons there would be no chemistry, and light would be unable to interact with matter. If electrons were only a little heavier or lighter than they are, the world would look radically different. But how can a particle which is so tiny that it has so far been considered point-like actually be weighed? ... zum Langtext des Artikels
04.02.2014 - International Science Times / iScienceTimes [USA]
One-Atom Engine World's Smallest: Could It Be More Efficient Than One Running On Four Cylinders?
A theoretical physicist in Germany has envisioned a one-atom engine he claims would be more powerful than the combustion engine. In his paper in Physical Review Letters, Johannes Rossnagel claims that such an engine would be at least two times as efficient as a conventional engine operating according to the laws of thermodynamics. Rossnagel, from the Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, describes a hypothetical engine consisting of a calcium ion forced to oscillate between two laser fields, one heating it, the other cooling it. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.02.2014 - Nanowerk
Researchers build nanoscale single-ion heat engine
Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg are working on a heat engine that consists of just a single ion. Such a nano-heat engine could be far more efficient than, for example, a car engine or a coal-fired power plant. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.02.2014 - R&D Magazine [USA]
Physicists build pilot prototype of a single-ion heat engine
Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg Univ. Mainz (JGU), Germany, and the Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg are working on a heat engine that consists of just a single ion. Such a nano-heat engine could be far more efficient than, for example, a car engine or a coal-fired power plant. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.02.2014 - Popular Mechanics [USA]
The World's Smallest Engine Runs on a Single Atom
Physicists are building a nano engine that runs on a single atom and will arguably be the most efficient ever made. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.02.2014 - Opli [Israel]
Physicists at Mainz University build pilot prototype of a single ion heat engine
Nano-heat engine likely to operate at high efficiency / Publication in Physical Review Letters ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.02.2014 - Research in Germany
Physicists at Mainz University build pilot prototype of a single ion heat engine
Nano-heat engine likely to operate at high efficiency / Publication in Physical Review Letters ... zum Langtext des Artikels
31.01.2013 - Health.India.com [India]
Genes decide hierarchy in ants
Has it ever occurred to you as to what decides the division of labour and roles in an ant colony, known to be highly organised? The genes play this role, says research. Evolutionary biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany came to this conclusion in a recent gene expression study. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
31.01.2014 - Nature World News [USA]
Genes Determine Caste in Ant Colonies
The development of an ant colony's different castes is influenced by either novel or highly modified genes, evolutionary biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) discovered in a recent study of gene expression. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
30.01.2014 - ScienceNewsline [USA]
Novel Genes Determine Division of Labor in Insect Societies
Novel or highly modified genes play a major role in the development of the different castes within ant colonies. Evolutionary biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) came to this conclusion in a recent gene expression study. Dr. Barbara Feldmeyer and her colleagues at the JGU Institute of Zoology studied the question how the different female castes arise. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
30.01.2014 - RedOrbit [USA]
Division Of Labor In Insect Societies Determined By Novel Genes
Novel or highly modified genes play a major role in the development of the different castes within ant colonies. Evolutionary biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) came to this conclusion in a recent gene expression study. Dr. Barbara Feldmeyer and her colleagues at the JGU Institute of Zoology studied the question how the different female castes arise. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
30.01.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Novel genes determine division of labor in insect societies
Novel or highly modified genes play a major role in the development of the different castes within ant colonies. Evolutionary biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) came to this conclusion in a recent gene expression study. Dr. Barbara Feldmeyer and her colleagues at the JGU Institute of Zoology studied the question how the different female castes arise. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
29.01.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Novel genes determine division of labor in insect societies
Novel or highly modified genes play a major role in the development of the different castes within ant colonies. Evolutionary biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) came to this conclusion in a recent gene expression study. Dr. Barbara Feldmeyer and her colleagues at the JGU Institute of Zoology studied the question how the different female castes arise. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
29.01.2014 - Deutsche Welle
Simon: 'All sports are prone to doping'
A record number of doping tests will be carried out during the Sochi Winter Olympics. Doping researcher Perikles Simon talks to DW about a lack of efficiency with the tests and clever dopers. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
27.01.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Nanoscale heat engine exceeds standard efficiency limit
In 2012, a team of physicists from Germany proposed a scheme for realizing a nanoscale heat engine composed of a single ion. Like a macroscale heat engine, the theoretical nanoscale version can convert heat into mechanical work by taking advantage of the temperature difference between two thermal reservoirs. Because the single-ion heat engine is so small, at the time the physicists noted that it had the potential to tap into the quantum regime and experience quantum effects. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
22.01.2014 - Nanowerk
ERC 10m euros funding to develop new spintronic concepts
Professor Jairo Sinova of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has been allocated a highly coveted ERC Synergy Grant to carry out spintronics research together with project partners from the United Kingdom and the Czech Republic. The European Research Council (ERC) uses Synergy Grants to make it possible for outstanding scientists to work together on trailblazing projects. In order to receive the grant, each of the participating researchers needs to be among the best in their specific field and have enormous innovative potential. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
15.01.2014 - BBC News [UK]
Study shows ''brain doping' is common in amateur sport
Taking substances to enhance the brain is more popular among amateur athletes than taking drugs to boost the body. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
14.01.2014 - Nature World News [USA]
Lives of Gigantic Sauropods Explored in New Body of Research
When trying to make sense of the prehistoric world, paleontologists have long puzzled over the mighty sauropods, the largest land animals ever to have walked the Earth, famous for their long necks and tiny heads. The unique gigantism of sauropod dinosaurs has long been a mystery and has left a number of unanswered questions.A new collection of research available in the open-access journal PLOS One takes a cross-disciplinary approach to studying sauropods, trying to better understand the dinosaur group that contained species such as Brachiosaurus, Diplodocus and Apatosaurus. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
14.01.2014 - Science World Report [USA]
New Research on Sauropod Gigantism: How Dinosaurs Became so Large
Sauropods were the largest animals in Earth's history, roaming the Earth millions of years ago and weighing up to 80 tons. Yet despite the wealth of evidence, these creatures still puzzle scientists. One mystery in particular was how these sauropods regulated their own body temperature. Now, scientists may have found out just that along with other clues to these large animals. They've summarized sauropod gigantism in a publicly available collection. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
14.01.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
How Could Dinosaurs Weigh Up to 80 Tons? New Research On Sauropod Gigantism
Sauropods, the largest land animals in Earth's history, are still mightily puzzling the scientists. [...] One question that has been intensely debated is how these giants of the animal kingdom regulated their own body temperature. According to the calculations of the Mainz-based ecologist, the body temperature of these animals did not increase with body weight. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
14.01.2014 - RedOrbit [USA]
Publicly Available Collection Summarizes New Research On Sauropod Gigantism
Sauropods, the largest land animals in Earth's history, are still mightily puzzling the scientists. [...] One question that has been intensely debated is how these giants of the animal kingdom regulated their own body temperature. Dr. Eva Maria Griebeler of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz has now shown that the hypothesis is inaccurate that their body size was limited only because the associated rise in body temperature could have resulted in potential overheating. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
14.01.2014 - ScienceNewsline [USA]
New Research on Sauropod Gigantism Summarized in Publicly Available Collection
Sauropods, the largest land animals in Earth's history, are still mightily puzzling the scientists. [...] One question that has been intensely debated is how these giants of the animal kingdom regulated their own body temperature. Dr. Eva Maria Griebeler of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz has now shown that the hypothesis is inaccurate that their body size was limited only because the associated rise in body temperature could have resulted in potential overheating. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.01.2014 - United Press International (UPI)
Physical and brain doping may go hand-in-hand
The survey found an equal inclination by athletes to the use of legal and illegal substances for both physical and brain doping. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.01.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Scientific Study Suggests an Association Between Physical Doping and Brain Doping
Physical doping and brain doping apparently often go hand in hand. A study from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and Eberhard Karls University in Tubingen revealed that people who engage in physical doping often also take drugs for brain doping. The study was the first of its kind to survey simultaneously the two categories of doping and brain doping. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.01.2014 - MedicalXpress
Scientific study suggests an association between physical doping and brain doping
Physical doping and brain doping apparently often go hand in hand. A study from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and Eberhard Karls University in Tubingen revealed that people who engage in physical doping often also take drugs for brain doping. The study was the first of its kind to survey simultaneously the two categories of doping and brain doping. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.01.2014 - ScienceNewsline [USA]
Scientific Study Suggests an Association Between Physical Doping And Brain Doping
Physical doping and brain doping apparently often go hand in hand. A study from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and Eberhard Karls University in Tubingen revealed that people who engage in physical doping often also take drugs for brain doping. The study was the first of its kind to survey simultaneously the two categories of doping and brain doping. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.01.2014 - News-Medical.Net [Australia]
New research unit at JGU examines extreme experiences in human life using biomedical explanations
The German Research Foundation (DFG) is establishing a new research unit at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). The interdisciplinary group will examine how new biomedical capabilities can lead to extreme experiences in human life. Specifically, it deals with issues arising from the technologically assisted reproduction or medically assisted death. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
08.01.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
German Research Foundation approves research unit to study extreme experiences in life
The German Research Foundation (DFG) is establishing a new research unit at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). The interdisciplinary group will examine how new biomedical capabilities can lead to extreme experiences in human life. Specifically, it deals with issues arising from the technologically assisted reproduction or medically assisted death. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
08.01.2014 - News-Medical.Net [Australia]
DFG provides fund to study the impact of new media technologies on quality of life
The "Young Scholars Network on Media Use and Well-Being" brings together the expertise of 15 international young researchers exploring the benefits and risks associated with the use of media and their effects on psychological well-being over a three-year period. Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), the network of scholars, who will meet for a total of three workshops in Mainz, is under the supervision of Junior Professor Dr. Leonard Reinecke of the Institute of Media and Communications Studies at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
07.01.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Funding for international research network addressing media use and psychological well-being
The "Young Scholars Network on Media Use and Well-Being" brings together the expertise of 15 international young researchers exploring the benefits and risks associated with the use of media and their effects on psychological well-being over a three-year period. Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), the network of scholars, who will meet for a total of three workshops in Mainz, is under the supervision of Junior Professor Dr. Leonard Reinecke of the Institute of Media and Communications Studies at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
05.01.2014 - Fars News Agency [Iran]
Earth's Crust Dripped to Mantle in Archean Eon
Earth's mantle temperatures during the Archean eon, which commenced some 4 billion years ago, were significantly higher than they are today. According to recent model calculations, the Archean crust that formed under these conditions was so dense that large portions of it were recycled back into the mantle. This is the conclusion reached by Dr. Tim Johnson who is currently studying the evolution of Earth's crust as a member of the research team led by Professor Richard White of the Institute of Geosciences at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
01.01.2014 - French Tribune [France]
Earth's Ancient Unstable Crust was vertically Dripped into Mantle
According to a latest report, it has been revealed by the scientists that the crust that was formed during the Archeaneon about four billion back was extremely dense. The scientists have further explained that the formation of this crust has caused the recycling of the pieces inside the mantel itself. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
Contact Contact
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