Press Review 2014

18.07.2014 - The Scotsman
Scottish literature has global audience
[...] Earlier this month, the University of Glasgow hosted the first ever World Congress of Scottish Literatures. The Congress is believed to be the first comprehensive global conference dedicated to all aspects of Scottish studies that has ever been held, and attracted huge attention worldwide. [...] Six universities across the world are partnered with the Congress, including the University of California at Berkeley, and the universities of Guelph in Canada, Mainz, Otago, Charles University in Prague and Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
14.07.2014 - Research in Germany
Young researchers investigate social support in the age of globalization
Third phase of DFG Research Training Group "Transnational Social Support" successfully initiated ... zum Langtext des Artikels
10.07.2014 - MedicalXpress
L-dopa medication could be helpful in the treatment of phobias and PTSD
A drug used to treat Parkinson's disease could also help people with phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Scientists of the Translational Neurosciences (FTN) Research Center at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) are currently exploring the effects of psychotherapy to extinguish fears in combination with L-dopa. This drug does not only help movement disorders, but might also be used to override negative memories. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
10.07.2014 - Research in Germany
L-dopa medication could be helpful in the treatment of phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder
Scientists at Mainz and Innsbruck explore new treatment approach to overcome fear ... zum Langtext des Artikels
08.07.2014 - bionity.com
How knots can swap positions on a DNA strand
Computer simulations show how two knots on a DNA strand can interchange their positions ... zum Langtext des Artikels
07.07.2014 - The New York Times [USA]
Studying May Make You Nearsighted
Can too much studying ruin your eyesight? Maybe. A German study has found that the more education a person has, the greater the likelihood that he will be nearsighted. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
07.07.2014 - ECN Magazine [USA]
How knots can swap positions on a DNA strand
Physicists of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Graduate School of Excellence "Materials Science in Mainz" (MAINZ) have been able with the aid of computer simulations to confirm and explain a mechanism by which two knots on a DNA strand can interchange their positions. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
04.07.2014 - Research in Germany
How knots can swap positions on a DNA strand
Computer simulations show how two knots on a DNA strand can interchange their positions ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.07.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
How knots can swap positions on a DNA strand
Physicists have been able with the aid of computer simulations to confirm and explain a mechanism by which two knots on a DNA strand can interchange their positions. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.07.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
How knots can swap positions on a DNA strand
Physicists of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Graduate School of Excellence "Materials Science in Mainz" (MAINZ) have been able with the aid of computer simulations to confirm and explain a mechanism by which two knots on a DNA strand can interchange their positions. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
01.07.2014 - The Huffington Post [USA]
There's A Reason The 'Four-Eyed Bookworm'' Stereotype Exists
A new study in the journal Ophthalmology suggests reading and schoolwork may have a greater influence on nearsightedness (also called myopia) than genetics. The findings are based on 4,685 people who underwent eye exams and genetic tests and answered lifestyle surveys. Researchers from the University Medical Centre Mainz in Germany found that among people who had graduated from school after 13 years (which is how long it would take to complete the most rigorous levels of German primary and secondary school), 60.3 percent were near-sighted. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
01.07.2014 - AZoNano - The A to Z of Nanotechnology [Australia / UK]
Functionalized Molybdenum Trioxide Nanoparticles Can Help Recover Activity of Sulfite Oxidase
Molybdenum oxide particles can assume the function of the endogenous enzyme sulfite oxidase, basis for new therapeutic application ... zum Langtext des Artikels
01.07.2014 - Research in Germany
Artificial enzyme mimics the natural detoxification mechanism in liver cells
Molybdenum oxide particles can assume the function of the endogenous enzyme sulfite oxidase / Basis for new therapeutic application ... zum Langtext des Artikels
30.06.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Artificial enzyme mimics the natural detoxification mechanism in liver cells
Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have discovered that molybdenum trioxide nanoparticles oxidize sulfite to sulfate in liver cells in analogy to the enzyme sulfite oxidase. The functionalized Molybdenum trioxide nanoparticles can cross the cellular membrane and accumulate at the mitochondria, where they can recover the activity of sulfite oxidase. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
29.06.2014 - Medical Daily [USA]
Education Linked To Nearsightedness; Researchers Find More Schooling Means More Myopia
For many years, scientists believed myopia – more commonly known as nearsightedness – was written into your genes. But as rates of the condition increased worldwide, more researchers began looking for the environmental causes behind blurred perception of far-away objects. Now, a new study bolsters the theory, showing a correlation between education level, years spent in school and increased risk of nearsightedness. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
29.06.2014 - Labmate Online [UK]
German Research Foundation Approves Soft Matter Simulations Project
The German Research Foundation (DFG) has approved the establishment of a new collaborative research centre (CRC) to be coordinated by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). The new CRC/Transregio "Multiscale Simulation Methods for Soft-Matter Systems" will focus on method development for computer-aided research on structural properties and processes of soft matter. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
28.06.2014 - News-Medical.Net [Australia]
Members of JUGGLE network collaborate to improve project coordination
JUGGLE network at Mainz University provides for the exchange of information and news on the use of joint research resources as well as career development and research support offered by public funding agencies ... zum Langtext des Artikels
27.06.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Junior group leaders in life sciences establish JUGGLE platform for scientific exchange
The field of life sciences is at the crossroads of biology and medicine and is a key component of the research portfolio of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). Top-flight research into closely related aspects using analogous methodologies is undertaken at both the Mainz University Medical Center and on the main JGU campus. Fifty leaders of junior research groups working in the fields of biology, pharmaceutical sciences, and biological chemistry, at the University Medical Center, the Institute for Molecular Biology (IMB), and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have now joined together with the intention of improving project coordination and thus making their research even more effective. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
27.06.2014 - Headline & Global News (HNGN) [USA]
Myopia Linked to Higher Education and More Years Spent in School
A new study links short-sightedness (myopia) to higher education and more time spent in school. The study conducted by German researchers is the first to show in a population sample that environmental factors might overshadow genetics in the development of myopia. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
26.06.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Increased nearsightedness linked to higher education levels and more years spent in school
German researchers have found strong evidence that attaining a higher level of education and spending more years in school are two factors associated with a greater prevalence and severity of nearsightedness, or myopia. Published online this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the research is the first population-based study to demonstrate that environmental factors may outweigh genetics in the development of myopia. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
16.06.2014 - Research in Germany
Breakthrough for information technology using Heusler materials
Basis for future development of very high performance spintronic components ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.06.2014 - ECN Magazine [USA]
Active particles may enhance phase separation
[...] An international team of researchers – including Dr. Peter Virnau and Professor Kurt Binder of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), Benjamin Trefz of the JGU Graduate School of Excellence "Materials Science in Mainz" (MAINZ), and scientists from India and the U.S. – has studied the phase separation of a mixture of active and passive particles via molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theoretical calculations. The distinctive feature of the model used is that the "activity" of the particles is tunable, containing passive particles as a limiting case for which already phase separation occurs. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.06.2014 - Scientific Computing
High-performance Spintronics: 100-percent Spin Polarization of Heusler Compound Observed
It is the breakthrough that physicists and chemists around the world have long anticipated, and it will play a pivotal role in information technology in coming years. Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have managed, for the first time, to directly observe the 100-percent spin polarization of a Heusler compound. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.06.2014 - Research in Germany
Active particles may enhance phase separation
Model system used to illustrate phase transition of a mixture of active and passive particles ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.06.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Breakthrough for information technology using Heusler materials
It is the breakthrough that physicists and chemists around the world have long anticipated and it will play a pivotal role in information technology in coming years. Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have managed, for the first time, to directly observe the 100 percent spin polarization of a Heusler compound. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
12.06.2014 - Nanowerk
Active particles may enhance phase separation
Systems containing self-propelling particles, such as bacteria or artificial colloidal particles, are always out of equilibrium but may show interesting transitions between different states, reminiscent of phase transitions in equilibrium. [...] An international team of researchers – including Dr. Peter Virnau and Professor Kurt Binder of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), Benjamin Trefz of the JGU Graduate School of Excellence "Materials Science in Mainz" (MAINZ), and scientists from India and the U.S. – has studied the phase separation of a mixture of active and passive particles via molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theoretical calculations. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
12.06.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Model system used to illustrate phase transition of a mixture of active and passive particles
[...] An international team of researchers – including Dr. Peter Virnau and Professor Kurt Binder of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), Benjamin Trefz of the JGU Graduate School of Excellence "Materials Science in Mainz" (MAINZ), and scientists from India and the U.S. – has studied the phase separation of a mixture of active and passive particles via molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theoretical calculations. The distinctive feature of the model used is that the "activity" of the particles is tunable, containing passive particles as a limiting case for which already phase separation occurs. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
10.06.2014 - bionity.com
Atomic structure of essential circadian clock protein complex determined
Discovery of possible basis for treating circadian clock disorders and associated metabolic problems ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.06.2014 - ECN Magazine [USA]
Magnetic moment of the proton measured with unprecedented precision
One of the biggest riddles in physics is the apparent imbalance between matter and antimatter in our universe. To date, there is no explanation as to why matter and antimatter failed to completely annihilate one another immediately after the big bang and how the surplus matter was created that went on to form the universe as we know it. Experiments conducted at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have contributed towards a resolution of this problem. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.06.2014 - The Epoch Times [USA]
World's Highest Number of Song Birds in India
[...] An international team of scientists from India, US, Germany and Sweden sampled and analyzed the DNA of all songbirds found in the Himalayas and compiled some of the genetic material over the course of decades. The painstaking process  had them searching through old collections in European and North American museums  and studying individual feathers collected by field workers.They discovered that the birds of the area were not new species, but those that had emigrated from other regions and begun to live in the then newly formed Himalayas. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
08.06.2014 - Newsweek [USA]
East Germany's Steroid Shame
[...] "West Germany doped just as much, but it wasn't done as systematically as in East Germany," explains Perikles Simon, professor of sports medicine at the University of Mainz and one of the world's leading doping experts. "In West Germany it was basically done by individual clubs, and athletes could decide to participate or not. And West Germany used so-called good anabolics that you inject into the blood, whereas East Germany used the oral blue pill, which has much worse side effects." ... zum Langtext des Artikels
06.06.2014 - Opli [Israel]
Magnetic moment of the proton measured with unprecedented precision
Physicists succeeded in the first direct high-precision measurement of a fundamental property of the proton / Results will contribute to a better understanding of the matter/antimatter asymmetry ... zum Langtext des Artikels
06.06.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Magnetic moment of the proton measured with unprecedented precision
Physicists succeeded in the first direct high-precision measurement of a fundamental property of the proton.  The results will contribute to a better understanding of the matter/antimatter asymmetry. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
06.06.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Magnetic moment of the proton measured with unprecedented precision
Physicists succeeded in the first direct high-precision measurement of a fundamental property of the proton / Results will contribute to a better understanding of the matter/antimatter asymmetry ... zum Langtext des Artikels
02.06.2014 - Asian Scientist [Singapore]
Zeroing In On The Proton’s Magnetic Moment
As part of a series of experiments designed to resolve one of the deepest mysteries in physics today, researchers from RIKEN, in collaboration with the University of Mainz, GSI Darmstadt and the Max Planck Institute for Physics at Heidelberg, have made the most precise direct measurement of the magnetic moment of a proton to date. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
02.06.2014 - Research in Germany
Atomic structure of essential circadian clock protein complex determined
Discovery of possible basis for treating circadian clock disorders and associated metabolic problems ... zum Langtext des Artikels
02.06.2014 - bionity.com
Mainz and Freiburg immunologists discover immune system precursor cells that fight infection
Evidence presented of the existence of a previously unknown form of lymphocyte that protects against intracellular infection ... zum Langtext des Artikels
31.05.2014 - News-Medical.Net [Australia]
Protein complex structure that plays an important role in regulating circadian rhythm identified
Structural biologists have made important progress towards better understanding the functioning of the circadian clock. The circadian or inner clock coordinates the sleep-wake rhythm and many other body processes that regulate, for example, metabolism, blood pressure, and the immune system. A research team led by Professor Eva Wolf, recently appointed Professor of Structural Biology at the Institute of General Botany of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and Adjunct Director at the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), has for the first time identified the molecular structure of a protein complex that plays an important role in regulating the circadian rhythm. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
30.05.2014 - Research in Germany
International research group documents unique songbird diversity of the Eastern Himalayas
Article in Nature describes the relevance of ecological niches to the evolution of new bird species ... zum Langtext des Artikels
30.05.2014 - The Huffington Post [USA]
Proton's Magnetism Measured With Greatest Precision Yet
In an attempt to solve the mystery of the Universe’s missing antimatter, physicists have achieved the most precise measurement yet of the proton's inherent magnetism. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
30.05.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Atomic structure of essential circadian clock protein complex determined
For the first time, the molecular structure of a protein complex that plays an important role in regulating the circadian rhythm has been identified by a team of researchers. "Our circadian clock controls many important physiological functions," explained one resesarcher. If the natural rhythm is disrupted, as for example in the case of people on shift work, the likelihood of developing metabolic disorders, diabetes, or cancer is significantly increased. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
30.05.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Atomic structure of essential circadian clock protein complex determined
Structural biologists have made important progress towards better understanding the functioning of the circadian clock. The circadian or inner clock coordinates the sleep-wake rhythm and many other body processes that regulate, for example, metabolism, blood pressure, and the immune system. A research team led by Professor Eva Wolf, recently appointed Professor of Structural Biology at the Institute of General Botany of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and Adjunct Director at the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), has for the first time identified the molecular structure of a protein complex that plays an important role in regulating the circadian rhythm. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
29.05.2014 - RedOrbit [USA]
Unique Songbird Diversity Of The Eastern Himalayas Documented By International Research Group
Article in Nature describes the relevance of ecological niches to the evolution of new bird species ... zum Langtext des Artikels
29.05.2014 - AZoM™ - The A to Z of Materials [UK / Australia]
DFG Approves Establishment of New Collaborative Research Center for Soft Matter Simulations
The German Research Foundation (DFG) has approved the establishment of a new collaborative research center (CRC) to be coordinated by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
28.05.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
New research center for development of novel methods in soft matter simulations approved
The German Research Foundation (DFG) has approved the establishment of a new collaborative research center (CRC) to be coordinated by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). The new CRC/Transregio "Multiscale Simulation Methods for Soft-Matter Systems" will focus on method development for computer-aided research on structural properties and processes of soft matter. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
28.05.2014 - Nature World News [USA]
Unique Songbirds Make the Eastern Himalayas "Exceptionally Important"
More than 360 different songbird species are unique to the Eastern Himalayas, most of which cannot be found anywhere else on Earth. A new study details how exactly this came to be, and why the region's impressive avian diversity makes it an exceptionally important habitat to scientists. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
28.05.2014 - ScienceNewsline [USA]
International Research Group Documents Unique Songbird Diversity of the Eastern Himalayas
The Eastern Himalayas are home to more than 360 different songbird species, most of which are to be found nowhere else on the planet. This makes the region extending from eastern Nepal to the borderlands of China, India, and Myanmar unique and one of the most important hot spots for biological diversity in the western hemisphere. A recent research paper describes how this impressive bird community came about millions of years ago, emphasizing both the uniqueness and biological significance of this remote area. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
28.05.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Unique songbird diversity of Eastern Himalayas documented
The Eastern Himalayas are home to more than 360 different songbird species, most of which are to be found nowhere else on the planet. This makes the region extending from eastern Nepal to the borderlands of China, India, and Myanmar unique and one of the most important hot spots for biological diversity in the western hemisphere. A recent research paper describes how this impressive bird community came about millions of years ago, emphasizing both the uniqueness and biological significance of this remote area. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
27.05.2014 - MedicalXpress
Immunologists discover immune system precursor cells that fight infection
The innate immune system recognizes infectious agents such as viruses and bacteria. A group of lymphocytes known as "innate lymphoid cells" or ILCs plays a central role in the defense of the human body against infective agents. Professor Andreas Diefenbach of the Research Center Immunology at the Mainz University Medical Center, working in collaboration with scientists at the University of Freiburg, has discovered previously unidentified ILCs that are able to protect epithelial surfaces, such as those of the intestinal mucosa, against infection. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
27.05.2014 - Research in Germany
Mainz and Freiburg immunologists discover immune system precursor cells that fight infection
Evidence presented of the existence of a previously unknown form of lymphocyte that protects against intracellular infection ... zum Langtext des Artikels
26.05.2014 - CHEM_EUROPE.COM
Improved computer simulations enable better calculation of interfacial tension
Researchers from Mainz University identify novel mechanisms of logarithmic finite-size corrections relevant to the determination of interfacial tension ... zum Langtext des Artikels
26.05.2014 - News-Medical.Net [Australia]
ILCs play central role in defense of human body against infective agents
The innate immune system recognizes infectious agents such as viruses and bacteria. A group of lymphocytes known as "innate lymphoid cells" or ILCs plays a central role in the defense of the human body against infective agents. Professor Andreas Diefenbach of the Research Center Immunology at the Mainz University Medical Center, working in collaboration with scientists at the University of Freiburg, has discovered previously unidentified ILCs that are able to protect epithelial surfaces, such as those of the intestinal mucosa, against infection. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
20.05.2014 - Daily News [USA]
Improved computer simulations enable better calculation of interfacial tension
Personal computer simulations play an increasingly critical part in the description and development of new supplies. But, despite significant advances in laptop or computer technology, the simulations in statistical physics are typically restricted to systems of up to a handful of 100,000 particles, which is several instances smaller than the actual material quantities utilized in standard experiments. Researchers for that reason use so-called finite-size corrections in order to adjust the outcomes obtained for comparatively tiny simulation systems to the macroscopic scale. A group of researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has now succeeded in improved understanding how this approach functions when it is applied to assess interfacial tension, therefore enabling much more correct predictions. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
20.05.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Improved computer simulations enable better calculation of interfacial tension
Computer simulations play an increasingly important role in the description and development of new materials. Yet, despite major advances in computer technology, the simulations in statistical physics are typically restricted to systems of up to a few 100,000 particles, which is many times smaller than the actual material quantities used in typical experiments. Researchers therefore use so-called finite-size corrections in order to adjust the results obtained for comparatively small simulation systems to the macroscopic scale. A team of researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has now succeeded in better understanding how this technique works when it is used to assess interfacial tension, thus enabling more accurate predictions. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
15.05.2014 - The Hindu [India]
Not easy to practise what you preach
A German student who had no smartphone when she wrote her university thesis on the device's addictiveness last year now says she is loath to do without one. The title of the thesis by Verena Minge, a 25-year-old at Mainz University who is studying German, biology and educational sciences in preparation for a career in teaching, translates as "Put Away Your Mobile Phone Once in a While." It is advice that she herself strives to follow these days. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
08.05.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Jairo Sinova and Stuart Parkin are awarded Alexander von Humboldt Professorships
Germany's Federal Minister of Education and Research, Professor Johanna Wanka, and the President of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Professor Helmut Schwarz, have today conferred one of six prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Professorships to theoretical physicist Professor Jairo Sinova of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). In addition, Professor Stuart S. P. Parkin, Director of the Max Planck Institute for Microstructure Physics in Halle, Germany, a Fellow of the JGU Gutenberg Research College (GRC), and an external member of the Graduate School of Excellence "Materials Science in Mainz" (MAINZ) at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, is also among the award winners. The Alexander von Humboldt Professorship is Germany's best-endowed research award. In 2014, the Humboldt Foundation confers it on six leading international researchers from all disciplines. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.05.2014 - The Huffington Post [USA]
New Super-Heavy Element 117 'Ununseptium' Confirmed By Scientists
Atoms of a new super-heavy element – the as-yet-unnamed element 117 – have reportedly been created by scientists in Germany, moving it closer to being officially recognized as part of the standard periodic table. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.05.2014 - Business Standard [India]
New element with atomic number 117 set to become reality
Researchers at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, an accelerator laboratory located in Darm-stadt, Germany, have obtained evidence for the artificial creation of element 117.The experiment was performed by an international team 72 scientists and engineers from 16 institutions in Australia, Finland, Germany, India, Japan, Norway, Poland, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States, headed by Prof. Christoph Dullmann, who holds positions at GSI, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
02.05.2014 - Discovery News [USA]
New Super-Heavy Element 117 Confirmed
Atoms of a new super-heavy element – the as-yet-unnamed element 117 – have reportedly been created by scientists in Germany, moving it closer to being officially recognized as part of the standard periodic table. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
02.05.2014 - NBCNEWS.com [USA]
New Element 117 Vies for a Seat at the (Periodic) Table
Atoms of a new super-heavy element – the as-yet-unnamed element 117 – have reportedly been created by scientists in Germany, moving it closer to being officially recognized as part of the standard periodic table. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
02.05.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Superheavy element 117 confirmed
The stage is set for a new, super-heavy element to be added to the periodic table following research published in the latest Physical Review Letters. Led by researchers at Germany's GSI laboratory, the team created atoms of element 117, matching the heaviest atoms ever observed, which are 40 per cent heavier than an atom of lead. [...] The experiment was performed by an international team of chemists and physicists headed by Prof. Christoph Düllmann, who holds positions at GSI, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
15.04.2014 - Bio-Medicine
Sibling cooperation in earwig families gives clues to early evolution of social behavior
Looking at the question of how social behavior has developed over the course of evolution, scientists from the universities in Mainz and Basel have gained new insights from the study of earwigs. "Young earwig offspring don't simply compete for food. Rather the siblings share what is available amongst themselves, especially when the mother is absent," explained Dr. Jol Meunier of the Evolutionary Biology section of the Institute of Zoology at Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz (JGU). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
15.04.2014 - Nature World News [USA]
Social Behavior Clues found in Earwig Families
Among the big questions evolutionary scientists try to answer is how social behavior developed over the course of evolution. If researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz and Basel, Germany, are correct, the beginnings of an answer to that big question may be found in the smallest of places: earwigs. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
15.04.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Sibling cooperation in earwig families gives clues to early evolution of social behavior
Looking at the question of how social behavior has developed over the course of evolution, scientists from the universities in Mainz and Basel have gained new insights from the study of earwigs. "Young earwig offspring don't simply compete for food. Rather the siblings share what is available amongst themselves, especially when the mother is absent," explained Dr. Joël Meunier of the Evolutionary Biology section of the Institute of Zoology at Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz (JGU). The team of biologists from Mainz University and the University of Basel investigated the interactions between siblings of the European earwig (Forficula auricularia). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.04.2014 - ECN Magazine [USA]
Domain walls in nanowires cleverly set in motion
Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have achieved a major breakthrough in the development of methods of information processing in nanomagnets. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.04.2014 - Daily News [USA]
Domain walls in nanowires cleverly set in motion
Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have achieved a important breakthrough in the improvement of procedures of data processing in nanomagnets. Using a new trick, they have been in a position to induce synchronous motion of the domain walls in a ferromagnetic nanowire. This involved applying a pulsed magnetic field that was perpendicular to the plane of the domain walls. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.04.2014 - AZoNano - The A to Z of Nanotechnology [Australia / UK]
Major Breakthrough in Methods of Information Processing in Nanomagnets
Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have achieved a major breakthrough in the development of methods of information processing in nanomagnets. Using a new trick, they have been able to induce synchronous motion of the domain walls in a ferromagnetic nanowire. This involved applying a pulsed magnetic field that was perpendicular to the plane of the domain walls. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.04.2014 - Research in Germany
Domain walls in nanowires cleverly set in motion
Important prerequisite for the development of nano-components for data storage and sensor technology / Publication in Nature Communications ... zum Langtext des Artikels
08.04.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Domain walls in nanowires cleverly set in motion
Researchers have achieved a major breakthrough in the development of methods of information processing in nanomagnets. Using a new trick, they have been able to induce synchronous motion of the domain walls in a ferromagnetic nanowire. This involved applying a pulsed magnetic field that was perpendicular to the plane of the domain walls. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
08.04.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Domain walls in nanowires cleverly set in motion
Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have achieved a major breakthrough in the development of methods of information processing in nanomagnets. Using a new trick, they have been able to induce synchronous motion of the domain walls in a ferromagnetic nanowire. This involved applying a pulsed magnetic field that was perpendicular to the plane of the domain walls. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
08.04.2014 - Opli [Israel]
Domain walls in nanowires cleverly set in motion
Important prerequisite for the development of nano-components for data storage and sensor technology ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.04.2014 - MedicalXpress
Computational methods for studying gene and protein function
Miguel Andrade uses computational methods for studying gene and protein function with an emphasis on molecules related to human disease. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.04.2014 - News-Medical.Net [Australia]
Researchers investigate how gene regulation affects evolution and development
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has received EUR 900,000 for three years to investigate, jointly with the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), how gene regulation affects evolution and development. The ambitious new research initiative GeneRED, or Gene Regulation in Evolution and Development, is jointly run by IMB and JGU's Faculty of Biology, funded by the Ministry of Education, Science, Continuing Education, and Culture of Rhineland-Palatinate. Its overarching goal is to gain insight into how epigenetics, i.e., the regulation of genes by elements outside the classical DNA code, can influence the development of organisms, both in the short term (growth and aging) and the long term (evolutionary adaptation). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.04.2014 - Research in Germany
New research initiative investigates gene regulation in evolution and development
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and Institute of Molecular Biology collaborate in three-year research project funded by the Ministry of Science ... zum Langtext des Artikels
02.04.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
New research initiative investigates gene regulation in evolution and development
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has received EUR 900,000 for three years to investigate, jointly with the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), how gene regulation affects evolution and development. The ambitious new research initiative GeneRED, or Gene Regulation in Evolution and Development, is jointly run by IMB and JGU's Faculty of Biology, funded by the Ministry of Education, Science, Continuing Education, and Culture of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
18.03.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Immunologists present improved mass spectrometric method for proteomic analyses
When it comes to analyzing cell components or body fluids or developing new medications, there is no way around mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry is a highly sensitive method of measurement that has been used for many years for the analysis of chemical and biological materials. Scientists at the Institute of Immunology of the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have now significantly improved this analytical method that is widely employed within their field. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
17.03.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Improved mass spectrometric method for proteomic analyses presented by immunologists
When it comes to analyzing cell components or body fluids or developing new medications, there is no way around mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry is a highly sensitive method of measurement that has been used for many years for the analysis of chemical and biological materials. A new breakthrough discovery offers new perspectives for research on the immune and nervous system. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.03.2014 - The Queensland Times [Australia]
Europeans have become 'whiter' in the past 5000 years
European humans have become "whiter" in the past 5,000 years, undergoing a distinct change in their DNA due to natural selection, according to scientists. In research published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, experts analysed DNA taken from ancient skeletons and compared it with the current European human genome. Teams from University College London and Mainz found that there were striking differences over time in the genes which are associated with hair, skin and eye pigmentation. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.03.2014 - International Business Times
Europeans are Getting Whiter, Ancient DNA Proves
Europeans are getting whiter, with lighter hair and eye pigmentation, researcher have discovered. An international team including anthropologists from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and geneticists at UCL analysed the DNA from 5,000-year-old skeletons. They found evidence that Europeans used to have darker skin, hair and eyes, with further analysis showing this change was a result of natural selection. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.03.2014 - The New Zealand Herald [New Zealand]
Europeans have become whiter
European humans have become "whiter" in the past 5,000 years, undergoing a distinct change in their DNA due to natural selection, according to scientists. In research published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, experts analysed DNA taken from ancient skeletons and compared it with the current European human genome. Teams from University College London and Mainz found that there were striking differences over time in the genes which are associated with hair, skin and eye pigmentation. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
12.03.2014 - The Independent
Europeans have 'got whiter' due to natural selection in past 5,000 years, scientists say
European humans have become "whiter" in the past 5,000 years, undergoing a distinct change in their DNA due to natural selection, according to scientists. In research published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, experts analysed DNA taken from ancient skeletons and compared it with the current European human genome.Teams from University College London and Mainz found that there were striking differences over time in the genes which are associated with hair, skin and eye pigmentation. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
12.03.2014 - French Tribune [France]
Europeans were Black about 5,000 Years Back, Say Researchers
On analyzing DNA samples from ancient skeletons, researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz have revealed that selection plays significant role in the evolution of the human genome even in the past 5,000 years. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
12.03.2014 - RedOrbit [USA]
Europeans' Appearance Altered Over Five Millennia Of Natural Selection
A great deal of research has been focused on the factors that have influenced the human genome since the end of the last Ice Age.An international team of scientists – including anthropologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), geneticists at University College London (UCL), and archaeologists from Berlin and Kiev – has analyzed ancient DNA from skeletons, finding that natural selection has had a major effect on the human genome even in the past 5,000 years. The result of this selection has been sustained changes to the appearance of people. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
11.03.2014 - The New Indian Express [India]
Europeans Had Darker Skin and Hair 5,000 Years Ago
Europeans had darker skin, hair and eye pigmentation 5,000 years ago – until natural selection resulted in lighter pigmentation, according to a new study of DNA from ancient skeletons. Anthropologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany and geneticists at University College London (UCL), worked in collaboration with archaeologists from Berlin and Kiev to analyse ancient DNA from skeletons. They found that natural selection has had a significant effect on the human genome even in the past 5,000 years, resulting in sustained changes to the appearance of people. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
11.03.2014 - Science World Report [USA]
Sexual Selection Lead to White Europeans in Just the Past 5000 Years
There has been much research into the factors that have influenced the human genome since the end of the last Ice Age. Anthropologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and geneticists at University College London (UCL), working in collaboration with archaeologists from Berlin and Kiev, have analyzed ancient DNA from skeletons and found that selection has had a significant effect on the human genome even in the past 5,000 years, resulting in sustained changes to the appearance of people. The results of this current research project have been published this week in an article entitled "Direct evidence for positive selection of skin, hair, and eye pigmentation in Europeans during the last 5,000 years" in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
11.03.2014 - Business Standard [India]
Europeans had darker skin, hair and eye pigmentation 5,000 years ago
New analysis from ancient DNA of archaeological skeletons shows that Europeans had darker skin, hair, and eye pigmentation 5,000 years ago.Anthropologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and geneticists at University College London (UCL), working in collaboration with archaeologists from Berlin and Kiev, have analyzed ancient DNA from skeletons and found that selection has had a significant effect on the human genome even in the past 5,000 years, resulting in sustained changes to the appearance of people. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
10.03.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Natural selection has altered the appearance of Europeans over the past 5,000 years
There has been much research into the factors that have influenced the human genome since the end of the last Ice Age. Anthropologists, geneticists and archaeologists have analyzed ancient DNA from skeletons and found that selection has had a significant effect on the human genome even in the past 5,000 years, resulting in sustained changes to the appearance of people. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
10.03.2014 - Science
New Diet, Sexual Attraction May Have Spurred Europeans' Lighter Skin
Why do some humans have lighter skin than others? Researchers have longed chalked up the difference to tens of thousands of years of evolution, with darker skin protecting those who live nearer to the equator from the sun's intense radiation. But a new study of ancient DNA concludes that European skin color has continued to change over the past 5000 years, suggesting that additional factors, including diet and sexual attraction, may also be at play. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
10.03.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Natural selection has altered the appearance of Europeans over the past 5,000 years
Anthropologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and geneticists at University College London, working in collaboration with archaeologists from Berlin and Kiev, have analyzed ancient DNA from skeletons and found that selection has had a significant effect on the human genome even in the past 5,000 years, resulting in sustained changes to the appearance of people. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.03.2014 - Opli [Israel]
Relativity shakes a magnet
Researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz demonstrate a new principle for magnetic recording / Publication in Nature Nanotechnology ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.03.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Relativity shakes a magnet
The research group of Professor Jairo Sinova at the Institute of Physics at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), in collaboration with researchers from Prague, Cambridge, and Nottingham, have predicted and discovered a new physical phenomenon that allows to manipulate the state of a magnet by electric signals. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
26.02.2014 - Nanowerk
Electron on the scale
Electrons are the quantum glue of our world. Without electrons there would be no chemistry, and light would be unable to interact with matter. If electrons were only a little heavier or lighter than they are, the world would look radically different. But how can a particle which is so tiny that it has so far been considered point-like actually be weighed? ... zum Langtext des Artikels
04.02.2014 - International Science Times / iScienceTimes [USA]
One-Atom Engine World's Smallest: Could It Be More Efficient Than One Running On Four Cylinders?
A theoretical physicist in Germany has envisioned a one-atom engine he claims would be more powerful than the combustion engine. In his paper in Physical Review Letters, Johannes Rossnagel claims that such an engine would be at least two times as efficient as a conventional engine operating according to the laws of thermodynamics. Rossnagel, from the Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, describes a hypothetical engine consisting of a calcium ion forced to oscillate between two laser fields, one heating it, the other cooling it. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.02.2014 - Nanowerk
Researchers build nanoscale single-ion heat engine
Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg are working on a heat engine that consists of just a single ion. Such a nano-heat engine could be far more efficient than, for example, a car engine or a coal-fired power plant. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.02.2014 - R&D Magazine [USA]
Physicists build pilot prototype of a single-ion heat engine
Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg Univ. Mainz (JGU), Germany, and the Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg are working on a heat engine that consists of just a single ion. Such a nano-heat engine could be far more efficient than, for example, a car engine or a coal-fired power plant. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.02.2014 - Popular Mechanics [USA]
The World's Smallest Engine Runs on a Single Atom
Physicists are building a nano engine that runs on a single atom and will arguably be the most efficient ever made. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.02.2014 - Opli [Israel]
Physicists at Mainz University build pilot prototype of a single ion heat engine
Nano-heat engine likely to operate at high efficiency / Publication in Physical Review Letters ... zum Langtext des Artikels
03.02.2014 - Research in Germany
Physicists at Mainz University build pilot prototype of a single ion heat engine
Nano-heat engine likely to operate at high efficiency / Publication in Physical Review Letters ... zum Langtext des Artikels
31.01.2013 - Health.India.com [India]
Genes decide hierarchy in ants
Has it ever occurred to you as to what decides the division of labour and roles in an ant colony, known to be highly organised? The genes play this role, says research. Evolutionary biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany came to this conclusion in a recent gene expression study. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
31.01.2014 - Nature World News [USA]
Genes Determine Caste in Ant Colonies
The development of an ant colony's different castes is influenced by either novel or highly modified genes, evolutionary biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) discovered in a recent study of gene expression. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
30.01.2014 - ScienceNewsline [USA]
Novel Genes Determine Division of Labor in Insect Societies
Novel or highly modified genes play a major role in the development of the different castes within ant colonies. Evolutionary biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) came to this conclusion in a recent gene expression study. Dr. Barbara Feldmeyer and her colleagues at the JGU Institute of Zoology studied the question how the different female castes arise. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
30.01.2014 - RedOrbit [USA]
Division Of Labor In Insect Societies Determined By Novel Genes
Novel or highly modified genes play a major role in the development of the different castes within ant colonies. Evolutionary biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) came to this conclusion in a recent gene expression study. Dr. Barbara Feldmeyer and her colleagues at the JGU Institute of Zoology studied the question how the different female castes arise. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
30.01.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Novel genes determine division of labor in insect societies
Novel or highly modified genes play a major role in the development of the different castes within ant colonies. Evolutionary biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) came to this conclusion in a recent gene expression study. Dr. Barbara Feldmeyer and her colleagues at the JGU Institute of Zoology studied the question how the different female castes arise. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
29.01.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Novel genes determine division of labor in insect societies
Novel or highly modified genes play a major role in the development of the different castes within ant colonies. Evolutionary biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) came to this conclusion in a recent gene expression study. Dr. Barbara Feldmeyer and her colleagues at the JGU Institute of Zoology studied the question how the different female castes arise. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
29.01.2014 - Deutsche Welle
Simon: 'All sports are prone to doping'
A record number of doping tests will be carried out during the Sochi Winter Olympics. Doping researcher Perikles Simon talks to DW about a lack of efficiency with the tests and clever dopers. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
27.01.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Nanoscale heat engine exceeds standard efficiency limit
In 2012, a team of physicists from Germany proposed a scheme for realizing a nanoscale heat engine composed of a single ion. Like a macroscale heat engine, the theoretical nanoscale version can convert heat into mechanical work by taking advantage of the temperature difference between two thermal reservoirs. Because the single-ion heat engine is so small, at the time the physicists noted that it had the potential to tap into the quantum regime and experience quantum effects. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
22.01.2014 - Nanowerk
ERC 10m euros funding to develop new spintronic concepts
Professor Jairo Sinova of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has been allocated a highly coveted ERC Synergy Grant to carry out spintronics research together with project partners from the United Kingdom and the Czech Republic. The European Research Council (ERC) uses Synergy Grants to make it possible for outstanding scientists to work together on trailblazing projects. In order to receive the grant, each of the participating researchers needs to be among the best in their specific field and have enormous innovative potential. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
15.01.2014 - BBC News [UK]
Study shows ''brain doping' is common in amateur sport
Taking substances to enhance the brain is more popular among amateur athletes than taking drugs to boost the body. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
14.01.2014 - Nature World News [USA]
Lives of Gigantic Sauropods Explored in New Body of Research
When trying to make sense of the prehistoric world, paleontologists have long puzzled over the mighty sauropods, the largest land animals ever to have walked the Earth, famous for their long necks and tiny heads. The unique gigantism of sauropod dinosaurs has long been a mystery and has left a number of unanswered questions.A new collection of research available in the open-access journal PLOS One takes a cross-disciplinary approach to studying sauropods, trying to better understand the dinosaur group that contained species such as Brachiosaurus, Diplodocus and Apatosaurus. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
14.01.2014 - Science World Report [USA]
New Research on Sauropod Gigantism: How Dinosaurs Became so Large
Sauropods were the largest animals in Earth's history, roaming the Earth millions of years ago and weighing up to 80 tons. Yet despite the wealth of evidence, these creatures still puzzle scientists. One mystery in particular was how these sauropods regulated their own body temperature. Now, scientists may have found out just that along with other clues to these large animals. They've summarized sauropod gigantism in a publicly available collection. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
14.01.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
How Could Dinosaurs Weigh Up to 80 Tons? New Research On Sauropod Gigantism
Sauropods, the largest land animals in Earth's history, are still mightily puzzling the scientists. [...] One question that has been intensely debated is how these giants of the animal kingdom regulated their own body temperature. According to the calculations of the Mainz-based ecologist, the body temperature of these animals did not increase with body weight. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
14.01.2014 - RedOrbit [USA]
Publicly Available Collection Summarizes New Research On Sauropod Gigantism
Sauropods, the largest land animals in Earth's history, are still mightily puzzling the scientists. [...] One question that has been intensely debated is how these giants of the animal kingdom regulated their own body temperature. Dr. Eva Maria Griebeler of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz has now shown that the hypothesis is inaccurate that their body size was limited only because the associated rise in body temperature could have resulted in potential overheating. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
14.01.2014 - ScienceNewsline [USA]
New Research on Sauropod Gigantism Summarized in Publicly Available Collection
Sauropods, the largest land animals in Earth's history, are still mightily puzzling the scientists. [...] One question that has been intensely debated is how these giants of the animal kingdom regulated their own body temperature. Dr. Eva Maria Griebeler of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz has now shown that the hypothesis is inaccurate that their body size was limited only because the associated rise in body temperature could have resulted in potential overheating. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.01.2014 - United Press International (UPI)
Physical and brain doping may go hand-in-hand
The survey found an equal inclination by athletes to the use of legal and illegal substances for both physical and brain doping. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.01.2014 - Science Daily [USA]
Scientific Study Suggests an Association Between Physical Doping and Brain Doping
Physical doping and brain doping apparently often go hand in hand. A study from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and Eberhard Karls University in Tubingen revealed that people who engage in physical doping often also take drugs for brain doping. The study was the first of its kind to survey simultaneously the two categories of doping and brain doping. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.01.2014 - MedicalXpress
Scientific study suggests an association between physical doping and brain doping
Physical doping and brain doping apparently often go hand in hand. A study from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and Eberhard Karls University in Tubingen revealed that people who engage in physical doping often also take drugs for brain doping. The study was the first of its kind to survey simultaneously the two categories of doping and brain doping. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
13.01.2014 - ScienceNewsline [USA]
Scientific Study Suggests an Association Between Physical Doping And Brain Doping
Physical doping and brain doping apparently often go hand in hand. A study from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and Eberhard Karls University in Tubingen revealed that people who engage in physical doping often also take drugs for brain doping. The study was the first of its kind to survey simultaneously the two categories of doping and brain doping. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
09.01.2014 - News-Medical.Net [Australia]
New research unit at JGU examines extreme experiences in human life using biomedical explanations
The German Research Foundation (DFG) is establishing a new research unit at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). The interdisciplinary group will examine how new biomedical capabilities can lead to extreme experiences in human life. Specifically, it deals with issues arising from the technologically assisted reproduction or medically assisted death. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
08.01.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
German Research Foundation approves research unit to study extreme experiences in life
The German Research Foundation (DFG) is establishing a new research unit at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). The interdisciplinary group will examine how new biomedical capabilities can lead to extreme experiences in human life. Specifically, it deals with issues arising from the technologically assisted reproduction or medically assisted death. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
08.01.2014 - News-Medical.Net [Australia]
DFG provides fund to study the impact of new media technologies on quality of life
The "Young Scholars Network on Media Use and Well-Being" brings together the expertise of 15 international young researchers exploring the benefits and risks associated with the use of media and their effects on psychological well-being over a three-year period. Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), the network of scholars, who will meet for a total of three workshops in Mainz, is under the supervision of Junior Professor Dr. Leonard Reinecke of the Institute of Media and Communications Studies at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
07.01.2014 - PhysOrg.com [UK]
Funding for international research network addressing media use and psychological well-being
The "Young Scholars Network on Media Use and Well-Being" brings together the expertise of 15 international young researchers exploring the benefits and risks associated with the use of media and their effects on psychological well-being over a three-year period. Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), the network of scholars, who will meet for a total of three workshops in Mainz, is under the supervision of Junior Professor Dr. Leonard Reinecke of the Institute of Media and Communications Studies at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
05.01.2014 - Fars News Agency [Iran]
Earth's Crust Dripped to Mantle in Archean Eon
Earth's mantle temperatures during the Archean eon, which commenced some 4 billion years ago, were significantly higher than they are today. According to recent model calculations, the Archean crust that formed under these conditions was so dense that large portions of it were recycled back into the mantle. This is the conclusion reached by Dr. Tim Johnson who is currently studying the evolution of Earth's crust as a member of the research team led by Professor Richard White of the Institute of Geosciences at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). ... zum Langtext des Artikels
01.01.2014 - French Tribune [France]
Earth's Ancient Unstable Crust was vertically Dripped into Mantle
According to a latest report, it has been revealed by the scientists that the crust that was formed during the Archeaneon about four billion back was extremely dense. The scientists have further explained that the formation of this crust has caused the recycling of the pieces inside the mantel itself. ... zum Langtext des Artikels
Contact Contact
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Johannes Gutenberg University
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